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August 13, 2012
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now by davespertine now by davespertine
"By trying to open this world where we can forget reality for a while and just live for this very moment, I want to express feelings, provoke emotions, tell stories in which the watchers create their own pieces of scenery." *tuminka

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:iconmoscaliovam:
moscaliovam Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
Makes me think if the art of photography is about portraying NOW?
I would tell it's always Now and Something, but Now is always present.
Every picture is, in fact, a group portrait.
:D
:heart:
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:icondavespertine:
davespertine Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
when you look at a photograph
the experience of viewing is different each time

moments are not contained in images
NOw is this moment, this current experience
it is when we choose to press
'click'
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:iconmoscaliovam:
moscaliovam Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
Hmmm... "now" is void until you fill it with something.
image or experience or a link to another "now" that is "then":

I agree that time does not exist, but we do exist in time, and we fill it with our things, so we make it exist.
I press click many times, creating different images.
Each click captures the Now of the moment + something else.
One Now comes after another.
And I remember each one.
:D
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:icondavespertine:
davespertine Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
'now' is full of everything
it is the before and the after which are the voids that we fill

if time does not exist
and we exist in time
then we would not exist
therefore we exist and time doesn't :)

the trouble with photography and the 'now' is that we can not capture them all
try to pick the best 'now' that you can and make the most of it ;)
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:iconmoscaliovam:
moscaliovam Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
We exist in many things that, in fact, do not exist.
:D
Time is our imaginary friend (or rather foe).
What, in fact, exists, is a lot of various spacial movements (the earth and the sun) and physiological processes (ageing).
Nothing more.
We can say that time is one of the features of our mind.

I can even say that "now" does not really exist, too: when you haven't perceived it it is totally out of you, and when you have, it's not now anymore.
But we still can capture it.
:heart:
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:icondavespertine:
davespertine Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
movements don't exist
things exist in different places at different times
if we have a concept in which to imagine that

nothing can move within the now
nothing ages in the moment of now
time only exists as a concept outside of now :)

'now' is the only reality
perhaps it is possible to make it eternal
at least in an internal sense
by neither remembering or imagining anything else
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:iconmoscaliovam:
moscaliovam Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
mmm Bergsonian?

This last thing is quite close to what a Dostoevsky character said: he then shot himself to prove it.
He didn't need to: the concept is quite suicidal as it is.
:)
You are alive and creative because you don't, in fact, do what you said.
:heart:
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:icondavespertine:
davespertine Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2013
time is a rational thing
in an irrational sense it doesn't exist
only the rational processing of the awareness of change by our senses stands in the way of this

any concepts on time are not conceived by the rational mind
rational processes simply recognise the relevance of such ideas
Columbus or whoever may have discovered America
but that doesn't mean that it was not discovered previously by someone else

this ownership of things is incentivized because without it people simply wouldn't bother
this probably means that in the scheme of things and by consensus it really isn't important at all

knowledge is the hoardings of the compulsive
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